Skip to main content

About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
CSPAN 13
CNN 6
CSPAN2 4
MSNBC 3
KCSM (PBS) 2
KQED (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
WETA 1
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
LANGUAGE
English 32
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
. we have lots of things in common with the u.s., fast, generous territory, homogeneous people, hardworking people. we don't have racial problems that affect some african countries or the wars that are waged in europe nor the religious conflict of europe itself. and therefore latin america is called to compromise or rather commitment with its own fate. and therefore we are looking forward to president obama's words. we are all left-handed. we have many coincidences. we studied in harvard, both of us. we are sportsmen. president obama continues to be a basketball player. i was in my time as well. i think the first lady of the u.s. is very good-looking, and president obama has said the same thing about the first lady of chile. there are plenty of 0 coincidences. but the most important one is the one we'll find this afternoon, and modestly if i could suggest to president obama, we hope to have a partnership that is two -- one where we have all responsibilities and not existentialism because it's never been enough. rather a partnership of collaboration between latin america and the
strike on a key oil port. investigators in germany believe the fatal gun attack on two u.s. airmen in frankfurt airport was politically motivated. and and ecb interest rate hike is on the horizon as the bank frets over mounting inflation. ♪ >> france and britain say there will support a no-fly zone over libya if the situation there gets worse. the french foreign ministry says the two countries plan to do everything they can to increase pressure on moammar gaddafi. the libyan leader once more airstrikes on the rebels thursday morning. witnesses say warplanes bombed an oil port. the rebels have appealed for outside help, asking for u.n.- backed airstrikes to end the conflict. >> in the battle zone town, rebels are burying the dead. thousands turned out to join the funeral procession. there are mercenaries hired by gaddafi. they're preparing for new attacks on their town, a strategic seaport with key oil facilities, after recent air strikes, a ground attack by gaddafi's troops appears imminent. >> we're ready to face gaddafi's men. our scouts are telling us they are headed this way.
is preparing his own take on the u.s. role in the war. >>> also this morning, new fears in japan as radiation levels reach stunning new heights, and the air around the damaged nuclear plant is no longer the worry. rather, it's the water. >>> also something we're keeping an eye on right now in great britain. budget cuts are coming at a high cost for british leaders. protesters on the streets this morning clashing with police officers over proposed austerity measures. we'll have the latest from there. again, this is happening right now. from the cnn center, this is your cnn start morning for this march the 26th. i'm t.j. holmes. we do want to start with a new and disturbing incident in tripoli. this happened today. it's a story that maybe highlights the brutality of a regime that so many people are now fighting against. we want to bring in our cnn international correspondent nic robertson with the latest. tell us what happened. >> reporter: well, t.j., it all began this morning over breakfasttime when a lady came into the hotel, a middle aged appeared to be very respectable lady came into the h
general wesley clark. after that i discussion on the state of u.s. public education. >> i am a numbers guy. >> as a visual op-ed columnist for "in york times," charlie blow uses trawls and brett -- charts and graphs i do not decide that will talk about a subject and look for the data. i search for that that person see if there is something interesting and that agrees with an opinion that i have or sometimes what surprises me and what surprised by readers. >> sunday night it 8:00 on c- span. >> no reporter's roundtable on the role of nato in libya. from "washington journal," this is 55 minutes. scully is with "national journal" and we have missy ryan -- pentagon reporter. how significant is it that nato will step up and take the lead? guest: it is an important step but not everything the obama administration wanted. what they have done it is often rise nato countries to enforce the no-fly zone but that is only the first part of the u.n. security council resolution. what the nato countries did not do is authorize the full mandate, which is all necessary means required to protect civilians.
the previous day. u.s. federal reserve chairman ben bernanke has indicated america's economy is growing at a faster pace than last year but he cautions over soaring oil prices over continuing soaring prices in the arab world. >> sustained rises in the price 0 of oil and other commodities will be a threat to overall growth and price stability. >> reporter: bernanke submitted the policy report to congress on tuesday. he said commodity prices are high due to growing demand in emerging economies. referring to the current economic situation in the u.s., bernanke said there is increased evidence that a self sustaining recovery in consumer and business spending may be taking hold. he added the risk of deflation has become negligent libl. he said it could be several years before the unemployment rate returns to a normal level. noting the housing sector remains exception ally weak. he stressed the deed to ease monetary measures. >>> the european ministry has updated the forecast for the euro zone. they said the latest forecast of 1.6% growth this year is 0.1 percentage points higher than predict
at a major u.s. airport, the very same one where an air traffic controller fell asleep on the job. the close call this time around. >> and she said mexican pirates killed her husband while they were jet skiing on a border lake between texas and mexico. now six months later his body hasn't been found, no one has been arrested. the latest on the investigation, plus what she is vowing to do. it's all new, it's all live, it's "happening now". >>> hi everybody. we have a whole lot of ground to cough today. we're so glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon: we do indeed. i'm jon scott. "happening now", nato takes charge of air operations in libya as the fighting intensifies in one strategic oil town. those are antiqaddafi rebels, giving it all they've got, trying to retake control of brega as they come under rocket fire from pro qaddafi forces, the opposition getting hit hard in other parts of the cup as well. jenna: the u.s. considering a plan to arm the rebels, even though nato's chief is opposed to the idea. right now the cia has operatives on the ground in libya. jon: meantime a sign that qadda
on rebels this hour. new targets, more carnage and the intense pressure for u.s. military action. >>> also, the crisis that libya keeps pushing up gas prices across the country. that's creating more economic misery here at home, and new political danger for president obama. plus, protesters warn the u.s. congress may, may be on the brink of stoking new violence against muslims. anger and anticipation are building before controversial hearings this week on islamic extremism in america. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." libya centering the fourth week of what's now a full-fledged civil war. moammar gadhafi's forces are claiming new gains in their pounding of rebel-held cities. gadhafi maintaining a tight grip on the capital of tripoli, and the opposition appears to be holding out to benghazi in the east, but there are conflicting reports about who is in control of several other key cities, where fierce, fierce battles have been raging now for days. diplomatic sources at the united nations say the united states is working with france and britain on draft resolution on libya, a
] [inaudible conversations] >>> top officials from the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told senators today that the damaged nuclear power plant in japan, quote come continues to further stabilize, and that there have been no radiation readings in the u.s. the might be of concern. these remarks came before the meeting of the senate energy and natural resources committee. other speakers included officials from the energy department, the nuclear energy institute and the union of concerned scientists. this is an hour and 45 minutes. >> thank you for being here. this is a briefing. this is not a hearing has such. the reason we try to it as a briefing is so that people wouldn't have to file written testimony 72 hours ahead of time and all of that and things are changing very quickly with regard to the evolving situation that the nuclear power plant. will the committee doesn't have direct oversight on the safety of u.s. nuclear plants we do have to consider how events such as those affect the ability of the nation's nuclear fleet of 104 reactors to supply electricity, this of course the 104 react
chris lawrence with a look at what role the u.s. might play in the no-fly zone. chris, live at the pentagon, what's on deck for the u.s. now that the un has passed this? >> ali, the u.s. air force has a base in italy, the navy has two, and the italians have already okayed the use of their area to launch some of the missions in this know fly zone. there was an aircraft carrier in the mediterranean sea near libya. it left earlier this week and is now out in the arabian sea. without a carrier, planes will have to fly possibly farther, which means they won't be able to spend as much time over libyan aerospace which means you may need more planes to carry out the mission. some of the officials i've spoken with here in the pentagon say don't just think of a no-fly as american fighter pilots flying american jets. there are other ways in which the u.s. can contribute. unmanned drones, for instance. the u.s. also has signal-jamming aircraft that could disrupt colonel gadhafi's ability to communicate with his forces. overall what you'll have to do is have a very clear line of command
the equivalent of the pentagon. in the war against iraq, the u.s. war was committed from a headquarters in florida. they have a communications established with the commanders in the region in on the ground. host: what does it mean for the united states? guest: the and that is this is trying to hand off responsibility for the mission as quickly as possible. they wanted to do the things that only the united states could do, provide rapid command- and-control structure to get the operation going rapidly and effectively. and then to use the u.s. military firepower to destroy and dismantle gaddafi's command- and-control systems and particularly his surface to air missile capability. that is very important because no one -- everyone wants to minimize the danger to pilots enforcing the no-fly zone, and taking out those missile sites becomes very important to enable that. but that is the initial phase. that is starting to wind down if you look at the number of targets, the number of sites already it, i think this operation has been designed so that the u.s. could do the thing that the unit -- t
marine in the theater has talked about the main problems, that only with u.s. direct involvement and substantial financial infusions of money -- the budget for a spans greater than the entire afghan gdp. when we leave, how will the afghan government pay for it? from his perspective, on the ground, almost entirely by u.s. supervision and u.s. financing. >> first of all, that does not give adequate credit to our afghan partners. marja, which was liberated less than a year ago, which took 4200 u.s. marines when we started, which is down now to 1600, they have been able to hold the district community council election. this is right after their great debate. it was neat stuff. this was them running this. there are 10 schools open now in marja. there were zero under the taliban. these are afghans teaching in the schools, not us. we may have to rebuild the schools, working to repair irrigation systems, the market's the use to sell exclusively illegal narcotics and weapons and explosives -- there are now about 15 markets that sell household goods, food, and clothing. these are the afghan
say. and keep it there for a long time. >> the u.s. economy? >> almost no impact whatsoever. stock markets go up and down. they always overreact. i would not pay any attention to them. one way or the other. >> a common view. >> the only thing that makes sense is that it drops the most, but if you took seriously their estimate of the cost to japan, to claim that the wealth loss was almost $1 trillion. that is clearly not realistic at all. the drop has been too much. one reason is that the market has been then. there is not that much confidence in it. in europe, there has also been a drop in the stock market, but the same story. the u.s. stock market has been pretty resilient. nothing -- nothing much has really happened. maybe it is unfortunate, but japan is simply not a big market for the united states. we do not export much to anybody anymore. in particular we do not export a lot to japan. we worry about japan, it is too soon about a big interruption to our electronic and automobiles supplies. i do not expect that to happen. i do not think that what goes on in japan will have a big
that if something like this happens in the u.s. that you'll have the ability, and i understand apparently from some of the testimony, what i've read is apparently you guys are in charge. in terms of implementing, you're the go-to people now? is that accurate in terms of dictating who does what and who's in charge? an ongoing plan that's developing? >> in response to nuclear power plant, the inside of the facility is regulated by nuclear regulatory commission. outside of the plant is actually the local and state responders with fema supporting them. if you have a scenario that resulted in release, the most important thing to occur is successfully evacuate people away from that plant. those the type of things that the exercise plans work on. these are the things that local and state officials train against, and our role of the federal government, to support them we additional resources required in the event of an evacuations had to take place. those are the thing, and i think from a standpoint of your question, if you would like senators to have our staff, reach out with the state and give your staff
and artillery and at the same time u.s. officials cautioned the united states and allies intend to limit their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think o
. in about 40 minutes, u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, speaks with reporters at the white house. and in about an hour, british prime minister david cameron on why his government's actions on libya. on "washington journal," we will talk about federal spending with democratic representative marcia fudge of ohio, and republican senator mark kirk of illinois. and then we will speak with an ambassador. "washington journal" is live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> you are watching c-span bringing politics and public affairs. >> you are watching c-span, bringing you politics and public affairs. every morning it is "washington journal," our live call-in program about the news of the day, connecting you with elected officials, policymakers, and journalists. weekdays, watch live coverage of the u.s. house, and on weeknights, congressional hearings and policy forums. also supreme court oral arguments. on the weekends, you can see our signature interview programs. on saturdays, "the communicators," and on sundays, "newsmakers," "q&a," and prime minister's questions from the british house
in on our own. we should be going in under the u.n., not the u.s. flag. we shouldn't attack a country this didn't attack us first and shouldn't have boots on the ground. from that mouth, this is sort of the perfect way to go. we go in not under the u.s. flag but under the u.n. flag. we go in on the humanitarian mission, short-term limited thing, no boots on the ground. i think that going in, he did it the right way. my big question is how long are we going to be there? what really is our mission? i think the -- it is really, really fuzzy whether it is just to protect the rebels or to get gadhafi out. we are saying both things. how much is it going to cost? it depends on how soon we get out. if we could turn this over to the french government or to somebody else, as they say they are going to, in a couple of days, get out of there, then i think this is going to be a successful operation. if it drags on and gadhafi stays in power, it is another loser. >> pat buchanan, what are the odds if we are being realistic we will be out as the president had said in a mere matter of days, turning i
. >> i think it's also an issue for journal education. i think at least in the u.s., almost 2/3 of students in journalist school are female. >> primarily female? >> i think to some extent, it's a matter of giving them the training and incentive and also for female faculty to mentor young journalist students so they have in their head the idea that maybe they can do that. also going back to barbara's issue about skills or confidence. i think it takes a particular tenacity to be an investigative reporter. you have to be willing to stick with something to get your foot in the door. i had a student -- i used to teach investigative reporting as one the journalism courses that i taught. and my most aggressive student was a female. and even on the story assignment for class, she found out this guy wasn't going to give her an interview. she found out what time they came to work, and she was there to meet him at 7 a.m. when she arrived. she interviewed him outside of the door of his office building because he wouldn't give her an interview. i think it takes a certain amount. it can sta
and a cell phone. >>> president obama insists the u.s. had to get involved in libya to stop a massacre, and right now, secretary of state hillary clinton is in london, meeting with leaders from around the globe to figure out what to do about moammar gadhafi. here's what she said just moments ago. we don't have that, but we do have from the president last night in his nationally televised speech, where he promised ground troops would not be used to remove moammar gadhafi. and to prove that point, he took a page out of history. >> to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. thanks to the extraordinary sacrifices of our troops, and the determination of our diplomats, we are hopeful about iraq's future. but regime change there took eight years, thousands of american and iraqi lives, and nearly $1 trillion. that is not something we can afford to repeat in libya. >> the speech is doing little to calm gop critics this morning, including house speaker john boehner. he says americans still have no answer to the fundamental question, what does success in libya look like? and one of the presiden
.p.a. regs hanging over their head. the regulatory flexibility act. shaded areas indicate u.s. you is session. the 2009 research -- that's the word i can't read, organizations. look at how this is. this is what's happening from regulations. it's going up. on the unemployment scale. the r.e.f. requires the federal agencies to assess the economic impact on small business, we talked about that. to come up with alternatives because unemployment rates are around or above 9% for the past 22 months, it's time that we make these regulations be assessed and seven out of 10 of the new jobs are created by these small businesses. when you hear us talk about the pesticide act, it's very clear, there's the folks that are dealing with it right there. the farmers of america. and it's duplicative. that means they already have a permit that allows them to put out these pesticides and because of this ruling they're having to make -- get another permit at another cost and meet other guidelines for these pesticides. the sixth circuit, we think with this, made a bad ruling and these higher costs to producers and c
] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> more now on libya from the u.s. ambassador to the united nations, susan rise. she spoke to reporters for about 20 minutes at the white house before the daily briefing. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. as i mentioned this morning, we have with us today the united states ambassador to the united nations susan rice and was in a meeting with the president and u.n. secretary general and i would like her to speak about that meeting and she'll take questions from you and i'll step aside. thanks. >> thank you very much. good afternoon, everyone. i want to give you a brief readout of the president's meeting with the u.n. secretary general. as you might expect, significant portion of that meeting was devoted to discussing the situation in libya. the u.n. has played a positive and very important role in efforts to end the bloodshed there and hold the gaddafi regime accountable and support the libyan people. in libya, the united nations is demonstrating the indispensible role it can play in advancing our interests and defending ou
-- to determine the location of the deceased. >> but teams from a number of nations, including the u.k., the u.s.a., japan, taiwan, korea, china, new zealand -- they typically work in their own national units. where possible we have tried but teams and in areas where they can focus on places we know some of their countrymen are liable to be located. they work on a shift roster. they do 30 minutes on, 30 minutes all. they rotate. they're the most amazing, dedicated people. they have reduced risk to a minimum. risk that would be beyond anything we would normally accept in our lives. and they have focused on one thing -- with great optimism and a degree of hope he reads from the beginning -- and they still have that now. they still think light of the book may be somewhere." and that is the way they work. >> the latest headlines for you this hour. the libyan air force claims they are launching a new attack and in eastern libya. gaddafi is being investigated for possible crimes against humanity. president obama is sending aircraft to aid refugees fleeing libya peary had hundreds more -- fleeing libya
. there will be lots of different panel discussions across u.s. history. sunday night at 8:00 p.m., our guest is the president and ceo of the partnership for new york city. she is also a member of the federal reserve bank of new york. she will discuss the role of the federal reserve bank and other topics. thank you very much for being with us on an interesting friday morning. we will be back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> the turn of events in libya today, the country has declared a cease-fire in their attacks on anti-government rebels, possibly in response to the action by the u.n. last night. the security council declared a no-fly zone of the country, voting authorize all necessary measures to protect the libyan people, including air strikes. the associated press reported about one hour ago that libya's foreign minister announced a ceasefire and stoppage of all military operations, saying it will take the country back to safety and ensure security for all libyans. he also criti
contacts or other u.s. officials' contacts with the opposition since the -- that first meeting in paris between the secretary and mr. jabril. and tell us if you are at all closer to making a decision on whether to follow the lead that france so helpfully started out a couple weeks and recognizing them a legitimate government. >> since the start of the crisis, when we saw that the council had constituted itself as some kind of temporary governing body, i and certainly members of my staff recognized that some of those people were people that we had dealt with during our tenures in libya. and so right from the start, i had been reaching out to the leaders of the council. and since that time, since the embassy was reconstituted here as i said, we had extensive dealings and contacts through our various programs, especially educational programs, with the people of the east. i had a very active public affairs section in libya, and they were always communicating with the -- with the doctors and jurists and people who, in fact, now are part of the council. so we had a good in to those people. si
-- the u.s. should not do this unilaterally. but at the nato summit meeting with defense ministers thursday, he needs to come out of that meeting, nato needs to come out with a plan of action that sends a clear message to gadhafi and the people around him, your days are up, the game is over. >> david, will cain here. i want to ask a question, we could be waiting on an international coalition or approval to sanction action. i've been asking this question over and over -- why would we intervene in libya, i still haven't received an answer that totally satisfies me. the most consistent one is that it would be the right thing to do because people are dying. for altruistic reasons. here's my question -- if we're looking to do the right thing, why do we need international approval to do the right thing? >> i think it's extraordinarily important especially with the president who is committed to the principles of international cooperation, collaboration, working through the u.n. i think it's extremely important that this president stick to his principles. i do think he's going to have a hard time g
in the >> on tomorrow's "washington journal," former u.s. comptroller general david walker has a report on america's fiscal management. then political strategists maria cardona and john feehery and u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsberg. "washington journal" begins at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. coming up on c-span, morocco's foreign minister. foreign policy analysts argue for negotiating a peace treaty with the taliban in afghanistan. and britain's government presents its annual budget. thursday night, a look at education reform with michelle rhe and sacramento mayor and former nba player kevin johnson. they will discuss academic disparities between american children of different races and districts in country and why they hit the has worsened despite a doublinging of spending over the years. >> we all have to do our part. there are far too many kids that are lang witching in schools that are not doing well 3789 there are also kids that live in nice neighborhoods. >> i concur with him. >> you know, we are in a position right now in this country where if you were to tell me the zip code that a
100 people. only one aircraft was down oed in that particular attack, one u.s. aircraft, and that's always been the symbol, that sculpture that you're seeing on the scene. and so clearly some p.r. work to use that as the picture, if you like, for moammar gadhafi's statement, assuming it is moammar gadhafi. aggressors, animals, criminals, tyrants, all tyrants fall under the pressure of the masses. those are the words, pretty much everything that we have heard on previous occasions in what sounds to be like it's going to be quite a long speech by moammar gadhafi. but he does say the people have been given weapons, all people have been given weapons, this will be hell, he says, and he called upon his own people to take part in what he's calling against the aggressives the new crusaders war. he then talks about how they will -- that the aggressors, referring to, of course, the allied forces, will not enjoy oil, we will continue to fight. that's moammar gadhafi, we believe, speaking. we be will back in just a moment. this is cnn. it takes knowing we have our work cut out for us. flying
of the u.s. debate in part of the transfers to the transitional council? >> we haven't made a decision about arming the rebels or arms transfers, so there has not been any need to discuss that at this point. we did discuss nonlethal assistance and discussed ways of trying to enable the transition national council to meet a lot of their financial needs and how we could do that through the international community, given the challenges that sanctions pose, but recognizing they obviously are going to need funds to keep themselves going. we discussed a broad range of matters and certainly their presentation, which some of you may have seen earlier today as to what kind of civil society and political structure they are trying to build until libya, are exactly in line with what they have consistently said were their goals, their commitment to democracy and to a very robust engagement with people from across the spectrum of libyans is, i think, appropriate. we do not have any specific information about specific individuals from any organization who are part of this, but, of course, we are gett
-the security adviser is a point of contact. such as the u.s. system of the government that has a national security adviser to the president. the french government has a specific adviser on foreign security to the president. it provides a counterpart for those countries. >> how has the nic improved crisis management? >> it gives us the opportunity to have information from the services in real time. as we go through what has been happening in north africa, it has enabled us to cross reference. i think it has enabled us to have l.a. --a in more than one department. it is extremely useful to have somebody we can talk to a commission if we require. for example, if there is a specific issue, that has been -- i also debate it puts education in government that can be expensive. >> last question. how has crisis management, are you looking at what prices management has done -- crisis management has done and ways to change or improve it? >> i think that is how it was originally conceived. it's first and overriding task is strategic. it is important to have that distinction between the large a scale
with commenting on recent comments that were made about fairness in the u.s. tax code even though it's not a tax code discussion. i want to clarify that i guess my definition of fairness isn't the same as what's described when 45% of the american people don't pay any income tax at all. the top tax bracts are paying 35% of their income and the top are paying 70% of all income tax. i disagree with that definition of fairness and i want to clarify that in the context of budg budg budg budgetary. the epa, this is a different direction than what has been taken so far. they have five education efforts in their recent congressional document talking about support and work and partnership with k-12 schools. federal and state agencies to establish priorities and leverage resources. lastly, an effort to increase promotion of green principles and increase the nation's scientific education. i would like to know if the department of education has been involved in those efforts through the e prngs a because it seems they should be talked about in education, not through epa. >> we had a good partnership with ad
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)